DR. EVE L. EWING 

Dr. Eve L. Ewing is a sociologist, poet, essayist, visual artist, and educator. Her research is focused on racism, social inequality, urban policy, and the impact of these forces on American public schools and the lives of young people. Having received a doctorate from Harvard University, she is a Provost's Postdoctoral Scholar at the University of Chicago; in 2018, she will begin as Assistant Professor at the University of Chicago, School of Social Service Administration. Currently, she is developing a book based on her dissertation, which explores the 2013 public school closures in Chicago and the structural history of race and racism in Chicago's Bronzeville community. Her first collection of poetry, essays, and visual art, Electric Arches, is forthcoming from Haymarket Books in fall 2017.

With over 48,000 followers on Twitter, averaging 15 million impressions monthly, Dr. Ewing is recognized as a thought leader and social influencer, especially in conversations involving academia, writing, black women, and the intersection of politics and popular culture. Her work has been published in many venues, including The New York Times, Poetry Magazine, The New Yorker, The Atlantic, The Nation, The New Republic, Union Station, and the Breakbeat Poets anthology. She co-directs Crescendo Literary with projects including the Emerging Poets Incubator and the Chicago Poetry Block Party. Eve is one-half of the writing collective Echo Hotel. She is the current President of the Board of Directors of MassLEAP and is based out of Chicago, IL.

 
 

AWARDS & HONORS:

  • 2017 Best Chicagoan to Follow on Twitter (Chicago Reader Best of Chicago)

  • 2017 Honorable Mention, Freedom Plow Award for Poetry and Activism (with Nate Marshall)

  • 2017 Doing the Work Award, granted by Being Black at School

  • 2016-2017 Dissertation Award, American Educational Research Association (Division G: Social Contexts of Education)

  • 2017 Focus Fellowship recipient, AIR Serenbe

  • 2016 Writer-in-Residence, WordXWord Festival

  • 2011-2016 Presidential Scholar, Harvard University

 

Electric Arches is an imaginative exploration of Black girlhood and womanhood through poetry, visual art, and narrative prose.

Blending stark realism with the surreal and fantastic, Eve L. Ewing’s narrative takes us from the streets of 1990s Chicago to an unspecified future, deftly navigating the boundaries of space, time, and reality. Ewing imagines familiar figures in magical circumstances―blues legend Koko Taylor is a tall-tale hero; LeBron James travels through time and encounters his teenage self. She identifies everyday objects―hair moisturizer, a spiral notebook―as precious icons.

Her visual art is spare, playful, and poignant―a cereal box decoder ring that allows the wearer to understand what Black girls are saying; a teacher’s angry, subversive message scrawled on the chalkboard. Electric Arches invites fresh conversations about race, gender, the city, identity, and the joy and pain of growing up.

Again and again reading Eve Ewing’s Electric Arches I felt some blooming in my body, or some flock of herons batting into the air in my body, which I think was indicating something like joy at witnessing the imagination at work in these poems, the imagination borne of rigorous attention coupled with critical love. Thankfully, there’s a word for all that: tenderness. And the joy is that we learn tenderness by witnessing it. Which is to say, and it’s not too much to say, this book is one of the maps to our survival.
— Ross Gay, author of Catalog of Unabashed Gratitude
Reading Eve L. Ewing’s Electric Arches is such an awakening and active experience— this book time travels, makes myth, immerses, paints, opens pathways. This is a living and breathing document, memoir and map, guidebook and scroll. ‘Recall this,’ writes Ewing in ‘Shea Butter Manifesto,’ both as invitation and as spellbinding command. I’m awestruck by the rigor and intimacy of this book, by its insistent love for both black past and black future. Ewing leaves no unnamed ritual uncovered, no implicit idiom uncelebrated. This book is a gift, a visual and lyrical offering to be treasured as gospel.
— Morgan Parker, author of There Are More Beautiful Things Than Beyoncé

THE NEW YORK TIMES

WHY AUTHORITARIANS ATTACK THE ARTS 

WASHINGTON POST

OBAMA SAYS HE BELIEVES IN COMMUNITY ORGANIZING. HE SHOULD LISTEN TO CHICAGO'S SOUTHSIDE 

THE ATLANTIC

FRANK OCEAN, HARPER LEE, AND THE RECLUSIVE ARTIST

MEDIUM

THE CHICAGO NEGRO & THE WARSAW GHETTO